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Musings

MUSE: ANDREW

Trinity Rose

Meet our friend and newest Meilė Muse, Andrew Pollard, (not pictured above, that's Kassidy in the Kas biker jacket)  the founder of LTH JKT a new fashion brand disrupting the market, with a unique business model “Maker to Market”. 

Thier jackets reflect the very principles they hold dear: quality, transparency, and individuality. By owning their means of production, they’ve streamlined the path from maker to wearer. In doing so, they can offer their jackets at one-third of the current market price while still obsessing over the highest quality materials and honing the fine details of design and fit.

Our Q's his A's: 

US: You are? 

AP: A searcher 

US: You love? 

AP: A good start-up

US: You wear? 

AP: Black, white, navy & grey

US: You believe in? 

AP: Nothing changing until I do

US: You dream of? 

AP: A kinder world 

US: You listen to? 

AP: Wise, humble people 

US: You online?  

AP: Insta @andrewpollard

Tumblr andrewjpollard.com

Twitter @andrewpollardny

WHAT DTC STAND FOR?

Trinity Rose

Photo cred: @tuulavintage 

Photo cred: @tuulavintage 

Within the last five years the term, “direct-to-consumer” has become a popular phrase in the fashion world, but what does it even mean, or better yet, how does it affect our lives.

Previously, the system has worked as designers transformed their ideas from fabrics and textures into samples, then took those samples and formed a collection to showcase at fashion week. At fashion week, designers would display their samples on models walking down the runway or if the designer couldn't afford a runway they would invite buyers to come view the collection at an event like Capsule. Following this, the buyer would make an order at a wholesale price: say, $100. Then the designer produces the pieces and ships it to the buyer and you pay $250 for the piece while the department store gets $150 from the sale. This extra money made by the department store is used to pay for the location, advertising, and all the other costs that come from having a brick and mortar store.

This strategy worked well, as designers could fund their collections through the amount of wholesale orders they received after fashion week. The dream for many was for a store like Nordstrom to pick up an order for 500 of your designs, launching you into the “big leagues”.

However, in the last five years, something new has started to develop where the middle man, Nordstrom, is getting cut from the equation. As more, and more stores adopt an e-commerce business model they lose the need for the middleman. This comes with many challenges such as lack of capital, and advertising.

Everlane is one of the most prominent examples of this model, though, what they call it is “radical transparency” as is stated on their website, “We believe customers have the right to know what their products cost to make. At Everlane we reveal our true costs, and then we show you our markup. In traditional retail a designer shirt is marked up 8x by the time it reaches the customer. By being online only, we eliminate brick-and-mortar expenses and pass these savings onto you.”

For a modern, ethical brand, this model makes a lot of sense. We want to buy sustainable fashion which has been manufactured ethically, and this becomes more affordable to us the consumer because rather than paying $300, we pay $150. However, even though it's affordable to us, it may not be as affordable to the designer as they still have all the expenses that aren't being paid for by the big department stores. Everlane, is an example of this, as they raised $19 million in funding, and still after this, they were seeking additional funding to be able to release their collection. Cutting out the the department store makes things cheaper to us, but also reduces the demographic that will purchase the brands clothes, as well the capital needed to produce the clothes. 

This problem has been approached in different ways as brands like Taylor Stitch uses resources such as crowdsourcing to fund their collection before they are produced- to meet an equal amount of supply and demand. Another brand similar to this would be that of DSTD who is able to sell premium denim at a third of the price of department stores. As stated on their website, "By the time clothes are sold to customers, they are marked up as much as 10 to 12 times. Then they go through this very vicious sales cycle. When you go buy a car for $50,000, if you saw it on sale for 30% off the next week, you'd freak out. In clothing, it's accepted. If you want something first, you're going to have to pay this ridiculous markup. Or you can wait to pick off the racks what's left over at more fair pricing. That's just not very customer-friendly”.

Many malls and department stores are experiencing a large drop in sales, as Coach recently closed 250 of their locations, and Michael Kors has started to send less product to department stores as well as removing many of their products from promotional settings. The benefits from cutting out the middleman has become more popular as sustainable brands gain more awareness and their values are becoming more widely accepted. For a brand to be direct-to-consumer it is not an easy route to take, but it gives the designer more control over how the money is used to produce their collection. In terms of sustainability, this provides more opportunity to invest into better materials and more ethical practices or just gives them an opportunity to make more money.  As consumers, I would challenge you to know the brands you wear, and what they stand for. How brands invest their money is a reflection of their values. The same goes for us as consumers.

- By Thomas Raybell @thomasraybell 

 

 

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this.

 

5 WAYS TO BUILD A MORE ETHICAL CLOSET

Trinity Rose

Photo via:@styleordiefashion

Photo via:@styleordiefashion

It's easy to want to be an ethical consumer, to talk the talk, but it's a whole other thing to put those values into practice. Below are 5 simple actions to build a more ethical closet: 

  1. Value and take good care of the clothes you already own. 
  2. Shop less, choose better. Only buy pieces you love. 
  3. Go for clothes that are high quality. 
  4. Buy vintage or used when possible. 
  5. Support ethical brands. 

 

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this.

CHANGING THE INDUSTRY

Trinity Rose

Photo Cred: @faithfullthebrand

Photo Cred: @faithfullthebrand

Second to oil, fashion and textiles is the most polluting industry in the world. Every stage in a garments life threatens our planet and its resources. Up to 8,000 different chemicals are used to turn raw materials into clothes, including a range of dyeing and finishing processes. This isn’t anything new to fast fashion or the contemporary fashion industry, as they have been built on the bottom line rather than the triple bottom line. The result has been extremely harmful to the environment and to communities around the world. There is a two-part solution to making the fashion industry more sustainable. Part one is what the consumer can do. Part two is what the industry can do. This article will be focus on some of the challenges in the fashion industry and who is doing what about them.

There are a number of challenges to overcome in the fashion industry. One of the biggest of these is sourcing, it can be very difficult especially when you're looking for a specific material. Finding sustainable materials is both expensive and limited. Stella McCartney is known for putting her own deeply held valves at the heart of her business and she has sparked awareness and action across the fashion industry. “Material is hard” says McCartney. “One of the hardest things is to design something that is desirable and then to take that design and make it in a way that is not conventional. We’re sourcing our own material, developing our own material.” McCartney is committed to eliminating animal products in her designs. However, for many designers they can’t afford to do this amount of research and development. After 15 years since the brand was born there are still very limited amounts of non-leather materials suitable for fashion.

“Unfortunately, the fashion industry’s business model is currently based on providing more and more clothes, faster and faster, for less and less money”. Explains Rachel Kibbe founder of Helpsy and leader of the social media campaign #itsnotjuststella. Kibbe’s explains the success major fashion industries could have in their sustainability practices if they followed independent brands business models. Supply chain is an example of this, where independent brands follow a closer ideal production cycle of “cradle to cradle” system in which nothing is wasted, and the earth is left the same, if not better than before. Smaller labels ignore the insane seasonal fashion cycles, opting for collections that can be worn all year around or simply producing fewer garments per season.

The Ethics of fabric is another hurdle for brands to overcome. As places like H&M might use organic cotton, there is likely no assurance that the fabrics are ethically sourced, fair trade, or processed with non-toxic or conventional dyes. Even choosing which fabrics you can use is limited, as nylon is made from petrochemicals which are very polluting to the environment. Nylon is non-biodegradable and releases nitrous oxide when manufactured (310 times stronger than carbon dioxide and causes global warming). Many independent brands are using recycled fibers, tercel, hemp, and other sustainable options. As well using waterless or chemical-free dyeing process and not using any kind of synthetic materials.

Here, are a few brands that are changing the fashion industry:

Kowtow is based in New Zealand, Kowtow is a contemporary mens and womenswear company that uses only 100% certified fair trade organic clothing that is ethically and sustainably made from seed to garment. Kowtow manufactures all its clothing in Kolkata, India, where the employees have benefits, from their children receiving free schooling to working in well ventilated and spacious working environments receiving a Fair Trade wage that provides and guarantees a sustainable livelihood.

Base Range is a line of sustainable easy clothing and underwear based in Denmark and France. Their collections favor a philosophy of creating clean, accessible, and natural garments in easy and soft silhouettes that will be forever wearable. With focus on innovative high quality, organic fabrics, Base Range’s garments benefit both producer and consumer while minimizing environmental impact.

Open Air Museum is based in Portland, Oregon and the label is built around slow fashion moment- conscious consumerism of sustainable, long-lasting, effortless fashion.The line finds influence in minimal Japanese silhouettes, primitive sculpture, and a oneness in relationship between art and nature.

Lastly, it's the our responsibility to support brands that are making the effort to change the fashion industry. Conscious consuming is vital for sustainable brands to survive, as well as not supporting establishments that are built around quantity over quality. It helps no one when we buy cheap clothes that fall apart, as overconsumption is the biggest issue in sustainability. This isn't something we can blame anyone else for but ourselves, so lets be apart of that change and practice self discipline.

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this.

By: Thomas Raybell (@thomasraybell)

MUSE: AMAHLIA

Trinity Rose

Photo Cred: @vitaminswim  Shop the Amber boys short above at Vitamin A. 

Photo Cred: @vitaminswim  Shop the Amber boys short above at Vitamin A

Our most recent Meilė Muse is Amahlia Stevens. Mama of Gemma and Ruby. Designer and founder of VITAMIN A. One of our favorite responsible swimwear lines. 

Our Q's her A's: 

US: You are? 

AS: A California girl 

US: You love? 

AS: Simplicity, nature, design and surprises 

US: You wear?

AS: Jeans, sandals and a white blouse or t-shirt  

US: You believe in?

AS: Reducing our environmental footprint, style, and sustainability.  

US: You dream of? 

AS: A world where my daughters can grow up more connected to nature and the environment. 

US: You listen to? 

AS: Everything from classical to Frank Zappa to Prince. 

US: You online?

AS: @amahliastevens @vitaminswim 

SUPPLY CHAINS ?

Trinity Rose

Photo cred: @soludos 

Photo cred: @soludos 

So… what even is a supply chain, and why does it matter?

In the fashion and lifestyle space, it has become trendy to talk about the supply chain transparency as a way for brands to demonstrate a sort of “goodness” that echoes the prominence of juice cleanses or Veganism – a low-key status symbol for the affluent to wear their commitment to sustainability on their sleeves, rather than the latest “it bag.”

The number of think pieces, case studies and press releases, dedicated to the fashion industry's supply chain model, and its need for change are starting to rival the amount of discarded Forever 21 jeans piling up in myriad landfills across the globe. But how many of us ‘normal folks’ understand what a supply chain even is?

By definition, the supply chain is pretty straightforward. Basically, the term refers to a company, and the network of suppliers and vendors needed to produce and distribute products to retailers or directly to consumers. Supply chains, which once took place within the same region have swelled to massive global operations, spanning multiple countries and involving thousands of people. And because of all these moving parts, and a need to keep the supply flowing freely, supply chain management is focused on making things cheaper and faster, which is where things may get a little tricky.

See, as any consumer is well aware, the fashion industry has some notoriously short lifecycles and its own interpretation of what seasons are. For example, most of us operate with this basic idea that a year has four seasons, but fashion, in an effort to drive more profit and get people in stores – using seasons like early summer and high winter in an effort to inspire people to revamp their wardrobes two, three, four times in a season.

But todays iteration of the supply chain is a far cry from its humble origins. In the old days, we’re talking pre-Industrial Revolution, the supply chain was relatively straightforward — people would spin wool sourced from their own sheep, and from there, would weave their own clothes, or sell the wool to a weaver. Early supply chains might involve a tailor or a merchant, and most people would have an outfit or two they’d wear until it was on its last legs.

Now, fast forward to the current world of fast fashion, flash-in-the-pan trends and social media. Today, the supply chain for a single company can span continents – from villages in Southeast Asia to South America, and the occasional pit stop in the United States – our clothes have likely seen more of the world than we can ever hope to, and the waste alone, not to mention workers’ rights, and emissions regulations, is an unwieldy beast that needs to be tamed.

Humanity has come a long way from weaving our own woolen sacks from the sheep in our own backyard, eh?

Fashion, fast fashion in particular, has grown to such a scale that the environmental impact is competing with cars and oil refineries for having the most negative effect on the planet. And in our current climate where the fate of the EPA hangs in the balance and the promise of a green energy future that once felt bright has given way to a new found cynicism in Trump’s America.

Maybe it is time us consumers gave this stuff a little more thought. It’s easy to tell people to buy more consciously, to buy eco-friendly clothing custom-made by a local artisan. That’s all well and good, and while the whole “buy local” initiative is awesome and people should support the businesses in their community, it may not be feasible for a college student or someone trying to outfit their family to consider the journey behind every article of clothing. In most contexts, we do still need to wear clothes.

So what can budget conscious shoppers do? Or those who want to try it all from embellished bomber jackets to leather pants and destroyed denim? Truthfully it’s all about striking a balance. A couple tips if you’re looking for a good place to start making some simple changes:

Go thrifting for more unique pieces – not only a good way to give back to charity or local small businesses but a great place to find something not all of your friends have.

Just buy less. Easier said than done for the serial shoppers among us. Buy only what you love, and not make purchases based on whether or not something is on sale. How many times have you bought a shirt just because it was $5 and didn’t wear it. Save that money for a meaningful purchase, or better yet, an experience.

And should you want to try the trends on the horizon, by all means, live a little. H&M and Zara, as well as ModCloth and others have been making major steps forward in the eco-friendly space. While there are always going to be some issues with global corporations, if you must head to the mall, look for stores working to make a difference. Sometimes larger corporations have more resources to do the right thing.

At the end of the day, we all have choices to make. The best thing to do is to become educated, to learn about the supply chain, from end to end. It’s unrealistic to expect an overnight transformation, from fast-fashion fanatic to someone sewing their own clothing from recycled fibers, but can we find a midpoint? What’s heartening is, more people are starting to become more aware of what retailers are doing, or not doing to make a difference. The real challenge will lie within our ability to speak with our dollars.  

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this.

By: Grace Sweeney 

 

MUSE: MELO & CO

Trinity Rose

Blogger, designer, letterer, mama - Mel is a woman of many skills and interests who is pursuing her dreams of running her own business + blog, as well as being a full time mom to her 2 year old son Hunter.

Our Q's her A's: 

US: You are? 

M&C: A blogger, designer, letterer + mama

US: You love? 

M&C: Style, design, green smoothies, cooking, and hiking with my dogs, little man and hubby.

US: You wear? 

M&C: Mostly monochrome and minimal pieces. I don't do super trendy anymore - so I tend to gravitate towards the classic silhouettes and quality fabrics that will last me more than a season. 

US: You believe in? 

M&C: Eating healthy and living life with a positive outlook! Always follow your intuition and your dreams. 

US: You dream of?

M&C: Travelling the world with my little family and making the most out of my life by growing my business and my blog so that when I'm old I have no regrets. 

US: You listen to?

M&C: Anything that's on the radio because I've been so busy that I rarely curate my own music anymore! My husband often decides what we listen to anyways, and he has a very diverse taste in music, so we listen to all sorts of things - anything from adele to oldies to electronic music. I'm a big fan of The Eagles though - it reminds me of summers when I was a kid. 

US: You online?

M&C: @melo_and_co 

blog/ www.meloandco.com/blogs/news

online store/ www.meloandco.com

WE ARE ALL A LITTLE GUILTY

Trinity Rose

Photo cred: @swoszowski 

Photo cred: @swoszowski 

Our generation tends to be a little excessive whether it's the Hunger Games, Ryan Gosling or even the fact that we touch our phones 216 times a day. You have that show that you have watched every episode of...3 times. Often times those things don't seem too uncommon to us. I remember one summer from the early 2000's when Lindsey was in town from university. It's important to note this was someone whom I always respected in terms of style. However, for the whole summer, she never repeated an outfit. She spent two days doing laundry before going back because she never washed anything. She wore over 100 different outfits that summer.

But Lindsey isn't alone. Turns out we like clothes. Oxfam estimated 1 in 10 of us only wear 10% of our wardrobe. That's about 2.4 billion garments that are never worn or used. But also, life is hard. And going shopping is just what the Dr. ordered. It makes us feel good. Being able to walk into a room and the hearts start rolling in like a Kylie Jenner Instagram post. Maybe it's a little black dress. Maybe you have a low-key sneaker game that lets everyone know you have style and it's understated, and you're not trying to prove anything. Either way, it's an expression of who you are. Reducing our wardrobe might feel like limiting a painter to only one brush. However, reducing the amount we shop, will increase our shopping experience, giving ourselves more time to consider things of value rather than frantically buying what's on sale on our lunch break.

Before we decide we have nothing to wear it's worth considering the effect we have. A recent statistic showed that each year 80 billion pieces of clothes are produced worldwide and three out of four will end up in a landfill. Also 2 billion pairs of jeans are produced every year and each pair takes 7,000 liters of water to make. Water is one of the most precious resources on our planet, and although we might not consider it, that is a little excessive.

I would never tell you not to shop, that's an extension of who you are. Though, I wonder if sometimes, we are all a little of guilty of over consumption.

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this. 

-Thomas Raybell (@thomasraybell) 

MUSE: JULIE THAI

Trinity Rose

Julie is second in our Meilė Muse series, and a talented fashion and lifestyle blogger. Above, Julie get's ready to fly in her Nike Roche sneaks, F21 t-shirt dress and Aldo shades. 

Our Q's her A's: 

US: You are?

JT:  A blogger and content creator.

US: You love?

JT: Clean interior spaces, photography, minimal fashion, traveling, and cooking.

US: You wear?

JT: More minimal but timeless pieces that are easy to streamline. Most of my wardrobe is in black, but I’ll gravitate towards anything neutral.

US: You believe in?

JT: Putting in hard work, in order to attain my goals. I also believe in setting high standards for one's self, as well as living life with good intentions.

US: You dream of?

JT: Working at a job that makes me fully content and happy, whatever it may be. 

US: You listen to?

JT: I can be very diverse when it comes to music. I love alternative r&b, soft rock, jazz, hip-hop, bossa nova, and acoustic.

US: You online? "social handles"

JT: Instagram: @lovejuliethai Blog: www.lovejuliethai.com

YOUR JACKET

Trinity Rose

Photo cred: @pepamack 

Photo cred: @pepamack 

There has been an ongoing debate in the responsible fashion world. Some say fast fashion brands who have responsible lines, initiatives and campaigns are hypocrites, others say they are contributors. 

We at Meilė don't have the answer, but we feel that it is an important question to ask, which is why we want to hear from you. Our biggest belief is that as consumers it is up to us to make conscious choices when shopping. If you haven't picked up on it already, we are of the ethos' "Buy less, choose well & make it last" and our technology on the Meile app was built to help you do just that.  

Below our newest addition to the Meilė crew Thomas Raybell (@thomasraybell) has written his thoughts on the above predicament. Thomas will be a regular contributor. Stay tuned for more from him and us.

 xo, 

Sophie & Trinity 

 

YOUR JACKET- 

It all comes down to that moment when someone says, "I love your bomber jacket" followed by the pivotal question "Where is it from ?". It's a simple question, completely natural, but at the same time we all understand, it's a power move.

We don't know what we want often times, but we find ourselves far too opinionated for anything to be decided. We have all been there before, scrolling through Netflix film after film. Or starving while simultaneously being passive aggressive in a group deciding on where to have brunch. Our generation has been given a lot of choices and sometimes it can be overwhelming. Together, with other unique free-spirited millennialists, we can find ourselves at a crossroad.

Fast fashion, brands like H&M, Forever 21, and Zara sell trending styles at affordable prices, and yet it seems a little cheap. Apart from the satisfaction of buying something on sale, some don't respect it, and worse, don't respect you. Fast fashion is a crossroad, and despite the negative connotation that sometimes fills the air, it is the most accessible, affordable, and ostentatious one can wear. This leads us back to that question, is it bad to answer, "It's from H&M".

Why are we hesitant? What are the implications from wearing basics to signature pieces from various fast fashion establishments? Maybe it's quality, sustainability, or equal pay for workers in developing countries. Maybe 10 years ago these might have been pretty black and white arguments, however, the discussion has become filled with gray lines. For example, in terms of sustainability let's say, “I don’t shop at H&M because they aren't sustainable fashion”.

Below are a few highlights from H&M’s sustainability report from 2015.

-H&M was named as one of the most sustainable global corporations in 2015 as well as one of the world's most ethical companies.

- More than 12,000 tons of textile waste was collected in stores, and over 1.3 million pieces were made with closed-loop material, a 300 percent increase from the previous year.

-The use of renewable energy in all stores, offices, and warehouses jumped from 27 percent to 78 percent, and CO2 emissions dropped drastically by 56 percent.

-H&M boasts that the non-profit Textile Exchange has recognized them as the world’s number-one user of organic cotton, which has a lighter environmental impact and reduces the use of “probably” carcinogenic pesticides.

H&M’s CEO Karl-Johan Persson offers some insight into other factors we might be hesitant about concerning the effects of fast fashion on developing countries. He says, “Buying products made in developing countries is the most effective way to lift people out of poverty and give them opportunities for a decent life. I would say it is extremely important that developing countries have access to international markets — how else can they make progress? H&M indirectly creates employment for over a million people, mostly women, in the countries that manufacture our products”. He continues to explain the topic of wages being a difficult issue while H&M seeks guidance from wage experts from global trade unions. Persson explains the role of the brand or buyer is not to set the level of wages, but rather negotiate between parties of the labor market.

On the other hand, while H&M might be one of the largest consumers of organic cotton, after reviewing their sustainability report further that only accounts for 13.7% of their cotton. A fashion reporter, Marc Bain stated, “... Such a massive amount of a thirsty, energy-intensive crop- organic or not may not be something to boast about”. H&M manufactures at least 600 million items each year and operates more than 3,200 stores. It’s difficult to justify the amount of resources it takes to fulfill that kind of operation, especially if it falls apart within 6 months. Because fast fashion isn't necessarily known for its construction to be lasting for a lifetime. This only adding to the 10.5 million tons of clothing that end up in landfills each year in the US alone. And a landfill overflowing with organic cotton is still an overflowing landfill. Linda Greer, director of the health program at Natural Resources Defense Council stated, “Fundamentally, there is a disconnect between the idea that you are selling a tremendous amount of clothing in fast fashion and that you are trying to be a sustainable company”.

There are a lot of options and even more trends, and the disconnect that Greer mentions is the crossroad we all face when deciding how to build our wardrobe. The bomber jacket was the most searched for item in 2016. Michelle Obama, as well as Kendell Jenner, popularized the look, and searches grew 612% over any previous year. So, where did you get your bomber jacket?

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this.

-Thomas Raybell (@thomasraybell)  

RESPONSIBLE FASHION!?!

Trinity Rose

Photo Cred: @swoszowski

Photo Cred: @swoszowski

Responsible Fashion, what does this really mean anyway? Most of us are aware of Responsible fashion brands and that movement, but what are the actual criteria that make a brand or a piece of clothing responsible or ethically made?

From our research these exact criteria can vary slightly and the weight on what matters more or less can vary depending on who you are talking to.

From our perspective here at Meilė what is most important is bringing a level of awareness and consciousness to when shopping. How you prioritize what criteria matters to you the most is ultimately up to you.  

In our opinion, if you "Buy Less, Choose Well And Make It Last" you are being a conscious consumer. This is an easy way for us all to contribute to reducing the environmental footprint of the fashion industry. 

Supporting responsible fashion brands is something we are proud to do. On the Meilė App you may notice items with a red heart on them, this means that those items fall under one or more of the following criteria: 

  1. Countering fast, cheap fashion and damaging patterns of fashion consumption
  2. Defending fair wages, working conditions and workers’ rights 
  3. Addressing toxic pesticide and chemical use 
  4. Using and /or developing Eco-friendly fabrics and components 
  5. Minimizing water use 
  6. Recycling and addressing energy efficiency and waste  
  7. Developing or promoting sustainability standards for fashion 
  8. Transparency 

Be sure to join our FB group for more articles and conversations like this.

MUSE: TABEA HUGHES

Trinity Rose

Tabea is the first in our Meilė Muse series. We met Tabea at a round table dinner we hosted a while back at Neue House in LA. We loved her then and now.  Above, Tabea strolls with her dog June in a REFORMATION body suit, SHANA MOTE paints and SOKO earrings. 

Tabea is a managing partner at Futuremade, a brand integrity and sustainable innovation agency focused on the fashion industry. There, she builds strategies of all kinds for a growing roster of clients. Before that, she oversaw product development and design management as the Head of Product at Reformation. On Thursday mornings, she teaches yoga. 

Our Q's her A's: 

US: You are?

T: Stoked for 2017!

US: You love?

T: The ritual of eating with friends. I also loooove my dog June's goofy smile when I walk in the door.

US: You wear?

T: Mostly Reformation and vintage, and a motley crew of athleisure. 

US: You believe in?

T: Tilda Swinton.

US: You dream of?

T: The french bean & cheese burrito at Trois Familia

US: You listen to?

T: Right now, Smetana's Ma vlast. But Bieber's Sorry takes song/video of the century.  During yoga and meditation, silence goes a long way.

US: You online? 

T: @tabeakay